Educational Sponsorship Program

Students Fahima and Latifa

Since 2009 TRUST IN EDUCATION has provided an opportunity for individuals, organizations and schools to sponsor students in Afghanistan through our Education Sponsorship Program. Life is extremely difficult for many children in Afghanistan. In all cases of our sponsored students the families are very poor.  Many of these children were previously working on the streets or at some kind of menial labor to help support their families. Of the approximately 60,000 kids on the streets of Kabul, many are often the family breadwinner, begging, selling gum, looking for scrap metal, shining shoes, and doing whatever it takes to survive.

Obtaining a sponsor is a life-altering event for a street child. Become a life-altering force!

Through sponsorship you offer an Afghan child the opportunity to attend school and change the course of their lives and their families.  Currently, approximately 80 children, both girls and boys, are being assisted through our sponsorship program.  A little over half are girls.  This program has proven results with students graduating from high school, and attending and graduating from university.  Areas of study for our university students include mid-wifery, psychology, computer science, Islamic law, agriculture,  and economics.  We expect to have as many as 16 students studying at the university level in 2016 (up from 10 in 2015).  They all take great pride in their country; they look forward to becoming professional working adults in Afghanistan as well as contributing to and helping to rebuild their country.

     Proven Results:  We have 22 high school and 3 university graduates to date!

What does a sponsorship cost?

The cost to sponsor a student in Afghanistan through our program is a $660 per year through high school.  Your sponsorship allows the family to let their child go to school and focus on their studies without the additional responsibility of working for money outside of school.  Each month our sponsorship program students “earn” $50 by working hard in school.  The balance of $60 is applied by TIE towards the expenses of sustaining this program.

Students Nelofar, Humaira and Sabora

To receive this financial support, the children and their families must agree, in writing, that the children will no longer work the streets and will attend school. A “street child” earns on average $50 – $60 a month. By agreeing to a set income generated by their child of $50 a month, the families are investing in their child’s education along with their sponsor.

If a sponsored child is found working on the street or misses school,  TIE’s program director in Afghanistan, Qudsia, meets with the family to address any problems.

Ashiana children with qudsia

Sponsorship students with Qudsia

Street children are highly motivated to learn. They know what it is like to be dependent upon the streets for means to survive. Qudsia serves as an intermediary between the children, their families and their sponsors. Qudsia, a mother with three of her own children, is passionate about her work with the street children.

How do I become a sponsor?

Click here to learn more about becoming a sponsor: Sponsor a Street Child.  The first step is to fill out the Sponsorship Application Form and send it back to us via email ( or US mail (Trust in Education, 985 Moraga Rd. Ste. 207 Lafayette, California 94549).  Additionally we will need the full year payment of $660 by credit card or check; this is a taxable donation!  Every following year in the month your sponsorship was initiated you will receive a reminder from us that your sponsorship renewal donation is due.  Periodically, you will receive information and photos about your Afghan student. Whenever someone from TIE travels to Afghanistan we hand deliver mail between sponsors and the children they assist. Please also feel free to contact us directly for more information or to initiate your sponsorship today at

Become a sponsor of an Afghan Student and impact of his or her life forever!

For links to more stories about the street children Trust in Education supports:

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